Yasuni Wildlife: Amazon Tapir

Yasuni Wildlife: Amazon Tapir

The Yasuni Wildlife is one of the most diverse on the planet, in the Yasuni Life has diversified into millions of ways, a nature explorer mind would get excited at any direction!

Sumaco Ñahui wants everyone gets involved! We want to start planting trees by May 2018. In order to get the project running, we have a fundraising program: a Conservation Timesharing program. Join Us!
Sumaco Ñahui is a Cloud Forest Restoration Dream to restore a deforested area next to Sumaco National Park & Antisana Ecological Reserve.

Shiripuno Amazon Lodge enjoy the remoteness of the Yasuni, with a set of trap cameras is able capture special moments of Amazonian Wildlife.

The Amazon Tapir is the largest mammal living in the vast Rainforest of the Yasuni.

The Amazon Tapirs are active mostly at nights, although some daytime encounters shows they wonder in the day as well.

The Amazon Tapir have forest trail on which they feeds on fresh and young leaves, they also eats a great deal of fruits specially figs.

The Amazon Tapir are excellents swimmers, sometimes seen crossing the Shiripuno River early in the morning or late in the afternoon.

English Name: Lowlands or Brazilian Tapir

Waorani Name: Tite

Kichwa Name: Sacha Wagra

Scientific Name:  Tapirus terrestris

Body length

The body length of a tapir 1.8 to 2.5 m (5.9 to 8.2 ft) with a 5 to 10 cm (2.0 to 3.9 in) short stubby tail and an average weight around 225 kg (496 lb).

Body Weight

The body weight of a tapir, on adult weight has been reported ranging from 150 to 320 kg (330 to 710 lb).

Body Height

The body height of a tapir stands somewhere between 77 to 108 cm (30 to 43 in) at the shoulder.

The Lowland Tapir is the largest surviving native terrestrial mammal in the Amazon. it closest relatives are horses, donkeys, zebras and rhinoceroses.

The frequently visit Forest Clay Licks to drink water rich in minerals that possible could help with plant based diet.

One of the coolest features is the Proboscis: a highly flexible organ, able to move in all directions, allowing the animals to grab foliage that would otherwise be out of reach. Tapirs often exhibit the flehmen response, a posture in which they raise their snouts and show their teeth to detect scents.

Shiripuno Research Center is carrying out a several small project to monitoring wildlife  and measure the impact of human activity in pristine forest.

The Yasuni Trap Camera Project is creating the baseline of wildlife activity along the trail net work and forest clay licks.

Waorani: The Nomads of the Rainforest

The Waorani People: The Nomads of the Rainforest and their Lifestyle.

The Waorani People are one of the last Nomads of the Rainforest of Ecuador living for hundreds of years along the Western Amazon Basin between Ecuador and Peru, the Waorani People made a home inside the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve, a unique place in the Amazon.

Yasuni is known for its super high Diversity of Life. It is not surprising to think, about the possibility to find people living in synchronization with this rich ecosystem.

The Nomads of the Rainforest

The Nomads of  Rainforest are the Waorani People and their closest kins: Tagaeri People and Taromenane People.

These last two groups are still wandering in depth of the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve, living the way it means to be thousands of years ago, they represent thousands of years of Amazon Rainforest knowledge and experience for mankind.

The Nomads of the Rainforest in Ecuador.

The Waorani House is built with forest materials easy to replace and find. Such as palm leaves, medium-sized tree trunks, and lianas.

The Waorani People are moving all the time, from one place to another, using and cultivating the forest resources and always planning where to move next.

Expanding and controlling their territories is an important activity to maintain constant access to Les fruits de la forêt: wild game and fruits.

The Nature of the Rainforest is everything for them, the forest provides them all: shelter, food, love, friends, spirits, and gods.

Waorani Lifestyle

Nomads of the Rainforest
Nomads of the Rainforest

The Waorani are Hunters-and-Gathers from the Amazon Rainforest in Ecuador, a millenarian lifestyle of humankind from all ancient tribes around the globe.

These nomadic Lifestyles combine with the high productivity of the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve allow them to pick the best of tropical forest production.

After the seasonal hunting and gathering they would embark into new lands to find a new living location in the immensity of the forest, once they find it, new plans come along with it and basic farming is the first activity do when a new spot to live was found.

 

The Nomads of the Rainforest have a different approach to live needs, on doing things only because they like them or they need it to be done to continue living in harmony with the forest itself.

The Nomads of the Rainforest

The Waorani People Today
The Waorani People Today

Today the Last Nomads of the Rainforest are connected with the Western World after a systematic culturalization process carries out by modern times.

During his process the Waorani people lost 50% of their ancestral land, this land is given to oil companies to pay democratic debts and forest fragmentation for palm plantations.

The Monkeys of the Rainforest

The Monkeys of the Rainforest

Noisy Night Monkey. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador

The Monkeys of the Rainforest are the most diverse group of mammals moving throughout the Amazon Basin.

Sumaco Ñahui wants everyone gets involved! We want to start planting trees by May 2018. In order to get the project running, we have a fundraising program: a Conservation Timesharing program. Join Us!
Sumaco Ñahui is a Cloud Forest Restoration Dream to restore a deforested area next to Sumaco National Park & Antisana Ecological Reserve.

Most of them spend their lifetime in the dense canopy covering all kind of habitats monkeys find a way to survive and diversify, many have a prehensile tail, one of the most interesting feature Nature has come out to fix the the challenge of reaching the edge of the trees in the canopy.

Humboldt’s Woolly Monkey. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador. Photo By Randi Vickers

The Monkey of the Rainforest are a very important creatures of the forest, in many ways for example: some species feeds on fruits in the forest, they do best dispersing the genes of of thousands of trees and lianas, Other species feeds eats a little bite of everything and they do the best insect control for many species of tree and lianas.

Napo Saky Monkey . Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador. Photo By Randi Vickers

Many species of Amazon Rainforest Monkeys covers a lot of area in their outing everyday, for fruits, flowers, invertebrates and forest clay licks. The Red Howler (Alouatta seniculus) and the White-bellied Spider Monkey (Ateles belzebuth) come down to forest clay licks to eat clay and drink the water if it is present.

Napo Saky Monkey. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador. Photo By Randi Vickers

The Yasuní Biosphere Reserve in Ecuador is the largest tract of Tropical Rainforest in the Western Amazon Basin, one of the most biologically diverse on the planet. Within the forest of the Yasuní is located Shiripuno Amazon Lodge where lives 9 species of monkeys, all of them sharing the forest resources in at this unique area.
Here is a list of the Monkeys you can find while visiting the Shiripuno Amazon Lodge found in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve.

Callitrichidae Familia
1. Pygmy Marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea)

Cebidae Familia
1. Ecuadorian White-fronted Capuchin (Cebus aequatorialis)
2. Ecuadorian Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri cassiquiarensis)

Aotidae Familia
1. Aotus vociferans Mono nocturno vociferante Noisy Night Monkey

Pitheciidae Familia
1. Red-crowned Titi (Plecturocebus discolor)
2. Napo Saki (Pithecia napensis)

Familia Atelidae
1. Colombian Red Howler (Alouatta seniculus)
2. White-bellied Spider Monkey (Ateles belzebuth)
3. Humboldt’s Woolly Monkey (Lagothrix lagothricha)

THINGS TO DO IN COCA

Here is a list of the different options of Things to do in Coca.

Puerto Francisco de Orellana is surrounded by an impressive access to a variety of iconic Amazonian Wildlife. Many of the most fascinating jungle tours starts in Coca, a cultural melting pot along the Río Napo.

Sumaco Ñahui wants everyone gets involved! We want to start planting trees by May 2018. In order to get the project running, we have a fundraising program: a Conservation Timesharing program. Join Us!
Sumaco Ñahui is a Cloud Forest Restoration Dream to restore a deforested area next to Sumaco National Park & Antisana Ecological Reserve.
Puerto Francisco de Orellana. Napo River. Orellana -Ecuador.
Puerto Francisco de Orellana. Napo River. Orellana -Ecuador.

Coca is the last reach of real civilization before the Río Napo transports you deep into the rainforest to the Parque Nacional Yasuní and beyond into the Amazon basin, next big town is iquitos in Peru.
In the 1990s the town was transformed by the oil industry from a tiny river settlement with dirt roads into a hot, teeming mass of concrete.
The capital of the Orellana province since 1999 (and officially known as Puerto Francisco de Orellana),
Coca is trying to start itself up. With a pretty malecón is extending block by block along the riverfront and bars where it’s actually pleasant to enjoy a drink with a stunning new suspension bridge now spans the Napo, taking traffic bound down Via Auca towards the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve.

Check below some of the activities you can do while you are staying in Coca.

Birdwatching

Yellow-tufted Woodpecker can be found at any direction from Coca.
Yellow-tufted Woodpecker can be found at any direction from Coca.
Birdwatching in the Taracoa Lake.
Birdwatching in the Taracoa Lake.

Birding in Coca can be effective in terms of seen variety of species from the Amazon Rainforest in Ecuador. From colorful Tanagers, funny Toucans, elegant Herons, skulking Antbirds, tiny Antwrens, Macaws and many others can be found during a day trip from Coca. Ask for Birding Trips.

Boats Trips

Boat trips along the Napo, ,Coca and Payamino Rivers to visit different destinations.
Boat trips along the Napo, Coca and Payamino Rivers to visit different destinations.

Coca is surrounded by 3 major rivers such as the Napo River, Coca River and Payamino Rivers, all three carry water from the Andes. The duration of the trips depends on the destination and interest you have.
All these rivers have indigenous communities living along their banks, pristine rainforests can be seen from the boats rides and human activities such as oil activities, agriculture, and tourism.

Museum

MACCO ha permanent exhibition worth visiting.
MACCO ha permanent exhibition worth visiting.

This is the first archeological museum in the region. MACCO Museo Arqueologico Centro Cultural de Orellana. The building was completed in 2015 and was inaugurated on April 30, 2015

MACCO is responsible for disseminating, promoting and rescuing the Amazonian cultural heritage and making it serve the citizens.
MACCO has a permanent archaeological exhibition about the Omaguas, integrated by a collection of more than 300 archaeological objects of the called Napo Stage (1,100-1,500 dc).

OPENING
Monday with reservation 48 hours in advance
Tuesday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Saturdays and Sundays from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

ENTRANCE FEE
National visitors: $ 2.50
Foreign visitors: $ 5.00

Yasuniland

Yasuniland is just 10 minutes away from Coca.
Yasuniland is close place to have a different perspective in town

Within 10 minutes boat ride from Coca along the Napo River, you are connected with the Rainforest.
Yasuníland is a theme park of adventure and nature, located in flooded forest in good shape at the moment it offers nice trails with giant Kapok trees and a Canopy Tower great for seeing wildlife and panoramic view of Coca and it surroundings.

Indigenous Communities

Pilchi community is located along the Napo River.
Pilchi community is located along the Napo River.

Within 10 minutes boat ride from Coca along the Napo, Coca,  and Payamino Rivers, you can visit indigenous communities and visit their start up tourism projects, you can learn about traditional ways of living in the Amazon Rainforest, from farming, cooking, danza, medicine and rituals.

We will add more activities as it arise around. Enjoy it!!

Amazon Rainforest Snakes

The Amazon Rainforest snakes has covered every niche the forest has created from the canopy to the ground, inside soil, inside water.

Sumaco Ñahui wants everyone gets involved! We want to start planting trees by May 2018. In order to get the project running, we have a fundraising program: a Conservation Timesharing program. Join Us!
Sumaco Ñahui is a Cloud Forest Restoration Dream to restore a deforested area next to Sumaco National Park & Antisana Ecological Reserve.

If you are walking through and spot a whip snakes resting on dead branches across the your path, is a signal of the forest is always in motion, sometimes canoeing along rivers or oxbow lakes and catch sight of a giant anaconda coiled, you cannot help but feel excited.

Calico is ground-dwelling snake, found in the flooded forest of the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Calico is ground-dwelling snake, found in the flooded forest of the Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Anaconda

Anacondas are the world’s heaviest snake at around 250 kg. They can grow about 10 metres and have a semi-aquatic lifestyle made possible by the position of their eyes and nostrils on the tops of their head. They seem to choose areas with thick vegetation (grassy areas ), pile of dead logs where they hide. They hunt mainly at night eating most manageable animals like capybara, peccaries and deer. It likes forest streams.

Amazon Whip Snake

Chironius Whip Snake exploring for prey
Chironius Whip Snake exploring for prey

Snakes in this genus (Chironius) are among the most abundant in all South American forests. They include both ground-living and canopy-living diurnal species that mainly prey on frogs but also take lizards and birds.

Chironius Whip Snake lives in the canopy of the Amazon Rainforest. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Chironius Whip Snake lives in the canopy of the Amazon Rainforest. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Chironius  seeks prey in shrubs and trees. Smart for a snake, there are records of this species investigating bromeliads for their frog prey. Bromeliads collects water making a perfect home for frogs.

Bushmasters

Bushmaster molting: notice the whitish eye. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve. Photo by our guide Daniel Hicks
Bushmaster molting: notice the whitish eye. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve. Photo by our guide Daniel Hicks

Bushmasters are a formidable South American viper and are the largest venomous snake in the western hemisphere. Bushmaster is a very large snake, often exceeding 6,5 ft (2 m) in length. But they can grow to be over 12 ft (3.5 m) making them the longest venomous snake found in the Americas. Strangely for a neotropical pitviper, bushmasters lays eggs as opposed to giving birth to live young.

Fer-de lance

Fer-de-lance resting along the trunk we used for crossing. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Fer-de-lance resting along the trunk we used for crossing. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Fer-de lance are nocturnal and solitary. It can be found near rivers and streams, basking under the sun during the day and lying still while well camouflaged in leaf litter or under forest cover waiting to ambush prey (including rats and mice) that comes within range during the night. When cornered or threatened, this species can be very defensive and may exhibit an S-coiled defense display. Juveniles are often semi arboreal and even adults are sometimes encountered in bushes and low trees.

Emerald Tree Boa

Emerald Tree Boa lives in the canopy, although it can come to lower vegetation. Active at night. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Emerald Tree Boa lives in the canopy, although it can come to lower vegetation. Active at night. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Emerald tree boas live in the trees and blend into the leafy background. They often use their strength to hang from branches and snatch prey like mammals and birds. They have white markings over their body and are locally common in the Amazon Rainforest. Juveniles of this species are reddish orange then mature to a magnificent green.

Rainbow Boa

Rainbow Boa, it lives inside leafcutters ants colonies. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Rainbow Boa, it lives inside leafcutters ants colonies. Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Rainbow Boas have iridescent scales -it shines at any direction or angle- giving this boa its common name. They feed on birds, lizards, and small mammals found in their range of northern and central South America. Can be found inside leafcutter ants colonies. Rainbow boas are very popular in the pet trade due to their beautiful colouration.

Boa Constrictor

Boa Constrictor resting in front of amazon explorers, Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.
Boa Constrictor resting in front of amazon explorers, Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Boa constrictors are a very distinct snake. Their colouration depends on habitat and there are many different subspecies. Although proficient swimmers, they prefer a more land-based lifestyle and seek safety in mammal constructed burrows. Constrictors are dwarfed by their anaconda cousins and grow to around 4 metres in length. Threatening their existence in the wild, boas are hunted for their skins to make various products.

Coral Snake

The South American coral snake is a beautifully patterned elapid (member of the Cobra (Elapidae) family. Coral snakes vary widely in their behavior, but most are very elusive, fossorial snakes which spend the vast majority of their time buried beneath the ground or in the leaf litter of a rainforest floor, coming to the surface only when it rains or during breeding season. Some species, like Micrurus surinamensis, are almost entirely aquatic and spend most of their lives in slow-moving bodies of water that have dense vegetation. Coral snakes feed on lizards and other snakes and are highly venomous.

Amazon Tree Boa

As their name suggests, Amazon Tree Boas live mainly in the trees and are classed as arboreal, but they can come down to the ground at night. Like the emerald tree boas, these snakes are also known to hang from trees to catch passing prey. They have varied colouration from an olive body to orange or yellow.

We will continue adding for species to this post, enjoy it!!

Fieldbook of the Birds of Ecuador

The Second edition of Fieldbook of the Birds of Ecuador by Miles Macmullan & Lelis Navarrete is recently printed!!

Fieldbook of the Birds of Ecuador

Check some of the Second Edition novelties are:
An appendix with the most striking mammals and sought after by visitors.
It includes 20 new bird species that have been registered in Ecuadorian territory to date (March / 2017).
The maps of the species present the different subspecies that exist in Ecuador.
400 new illustrations, many of which have not been published previously.
The taxonomy – although not the linear sequence – reflects the classification used by the IUO (IOC) in the list of birds of the world published in January 2017, version 7.1

  • 1680 species illustrated
    +3000 illustrations

Cost : $ 35

Free Shipping in Quito!!

Ecuador Global Big Day

Ecuador Global Big Day

The Ecuador Global Big Day is Huge Birding tradition among birders, birdwatchers and nature lovers.

Ecuador Global Big Day
Ecuador Global Big Day

The Global Big Day organized by the Cornell University and Ebird which seeks to find and watch the largest number of birds in a single day worldwide, and raise awareness about the conservation of natural habitats for birds, no matter where they are! Every bird counts!

Come and join us in one of the most important days for birding community!!

How does Ecuador Global Big Day work?

  • Upload your findings on Ebird
  • Organize field trips for the local school, community
  • Meet your friends and go
  • Go to your favorite birding spot

Here are some of the destinations available for this birding event, many locations of Ecuador’s Christmas Bird Count below:

Baby Rufous Potoo
Baby Rufous Potoo
  • Northwestern Choco – Mindo
  • Eastern Cloudforest – Cosanga
  • Amazon Lowlands – Coca Yasuní
  • Northern Ecuador – Chical
  • Southern Ecuador – Macas

Check below in the map other locations to go birding in May.

Join us on our Ecuador Big Day!

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest

Introduction to the Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest.

When we visit the Rainforest for the first time, the familiar Plants will blow our minds away in many ways, the amount of different Plants living in here is overwhelming.

As we go deep in our journey, we start picking up the regular plants around by looking at their natural characters such as leaves shapes, leaves arrangments, flowers, fruits.

Many of the stereotype plants have adapted to live in different habitats such as terra firme, várzea, oxbow lakes,  landslides, and in all the forest strata are present.

The well-established plants of the Amazon Rainforest are popular for many species of animals, just think about Cecropia Tree, it brings several species of Monkeys, Bats, Birds, Ants, Butterflies, Sloth, Kinkajou just to list a few!

We have prepared a small collection of the most common genera of plants you will find useful while you explore the Diversity of Life in the Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve and Yasuni Biosphere Reserve.

Check the list of the Common  and Conspicuous Plants of the Rainforest below:

ACANTHACEAE

Aphelandra

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Aphelandra ACANTHACEAE
Aphelandra flowers attract butterflies and hummingbirds. ACANTHACEAE

Aphelandra is a genus of flowering plants in the family Acanthaceae, native to tropical regions of the Americas. They are evergreen shrubs growing to 1–2 m tall, with opposite, simple leaves 5–30 cm long, often with white veins. The flowers are produced in dense spikes, with brightly colored bracts. Several species are grown as houseplants for their patterned leaves and brightly colored inflorescences.

ARACEAE

Philodendron

Philodendron is one of the largest genera in the Araceae family. It has an extremely diverse array of growth methods. The habits of growth can be epiphytic, hemiepiphytic, or rarely terrestrially. The leaves are usually large and imposing, often lobed or deeply cut, and may be more or less pinnate. They can also be oval, spear-shaped, or in many other possible shape variations. The leaves are borne alternately on the stem; juvenile leaves and adult leaves can be drastically different from one another. When philodendrons are ready to reproduce, they will produce an inflorescence which consists of a leaf-like hood called a spathe within which is enclosed a tube-like structure called a spadix. Birds eat their fruits

The name derives from the Greek words Philo- or “love, affection” and dendron or “tree”.

Anthurium

Anthurium is a genus in the Araceae family often growing as epiphytes on other plants. Some are terrestrial. The leaves are often clustered and are variable in shape. The inflorescence bears small flowers which are perfect, containing male and female structures. The flowers are contained in dense spirals on the spadix. The spadix is often elongated into a spike shape, but it can be globe-shaped or club-shaped. Beneath the spadix is the spathe, a type of bract. This is variable in shape, as well, but it is lance-shaped in many species. It may extend out flat or in a curve. Sometimes it covers the spadix like a hood. The fruits develop from the flowers on the spadix. They are juicy berries varying in color, usually containing two seeds. Anthurium can be poisonous due to calcium oxalate crystals. The sap is irritating to the skin and eyes. Birds eat their fruits

BEGONIACEAE

Begonia

Wildflower of Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest.
Begonia grows in tree trunks

Begonia is a genus of perennial flowering plants in the family Begoniaceae. Begonia are terrestrial (sometimes epiphytic) herbs or shrubs, and occur in subtropical and tropical moist climates, in South and Central America, Africa, and southern Asia. They are commonly upright-stemmed, rhizomatous, or tuberous. begonia are monoecious, with unisexual male and female flowers occurring separately on the same plant; the male contains numerous stamens, and the female has a large inferior ovary and two to four branched or twisted stigmas. In most species, the fruit is a winged capsule containing numerous minute seeds, although baccate fruits are also known. The leaves, which are often large and variously marked or variegated, are usually asymmetric (unequal-sided).

CAMPANULACEAE

Centropogon

Centropogon CAMPANULACEAE
Centropogon
CAMPANULACEAE
Cuyabeno Wildlife Reserve, Centropogon CAMPANULACEAE
Centropogon CAMPANULACEAE

Centropogon is a neotropical endemic genus of plant in the family Campanulaceae. The hummingbirds compete for the nectar of Centropogon

COMMELINACEAE

Dichorisandra

Dichorisandra is a neotropical genus characterized by its slightly zygomorphic flowers with large anthers usually releasing pollen by means of pores at the apex, as well as by its seeds that are embedded in a red or sometimes white aril, and tubers that often form at the tips of the roots.

Geogenanthus

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Geogenanthus
Geogenanthus
Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest
Geogenanthus

Geogenanthus is a genus of plants with 3 species in the family Commelinaceae (the spiderwort and dayflower family). The genus is distributed from Colombia to Amazonian Peru and Brazil.  Aerial shoots unbranched and determinate in length, up to 0.75 m, with a terminal rosette of leaves. The leaves at lower nodes mere tubular leaf sheaths. All plant parts somewhat succulents and grow on the floor of primary rainforests and possess a shallow underground, short, branching rhizome. Flowers consist of 3 green-brown sepals, 3 blue, pink or purple petals fringed with moniliform hairs, 4-6 stamens and 3 connate carpels. Its flowers have no fragrance detectable by the human nose.

COSTACEAE

Costus

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Costus COSTACEAE
Costus
COSTACEAE
Costus COSTACEAE

Costus is a genus of perennial herbaceous plants in the family Costaceae, widespread through tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Costus is often characterized and distinguished from relatives such as Zingiber (true ginger) by its spiraling stems. The genus as a whole is thus often called spiral gingers,

FABACEAE

Abarema

Abarema is a neotropical genus of large trees in the legume family. They grow from Mexico to Bolivia. Most of the species can be found in the Amazon Basin and the Guyana Highlands. They have deep-green fernlike foliage, with bipinnately compound leaves. For lack of a better name, they are collectively called abaremas.

Calliandra

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest. Calliandra.
Calliandra is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family.

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest. Calliandra.

Calliandra is a genus of flowering plants in the pea family, Fabaceae, subfamily Mimosoideae. It contains about 140 species that are native to tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas.

The genus comprises herbaceous perennial plants, shrubs and rarely small trees growing 0.5–6 m tall, with bipinnate leaves. The flowers are produced in cylindrical or globose inflorescences and have numerous long slender stamens which give rise to the common names powder-puff, powder puff plant, and fairy duster. These plants flower all year round.

Brownea

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Brownea Flowers
Brownea brings all kinds of insects.

Brownea is a genus of about 30 species in the family Fabaceae. The genus is native to tropical regions of the Americas. The species are shrubs and trees growing to 20 m tall.

Zygia

Zygia is a genus of flowering plants belonging to the legume family (Fabaceae). They are trees or shrubs, unarmed; Hermaphrodite plants. The bipinnate leaves, with a single pair of pinnacles; The petioles very reduced, glandular. Inflorescences fascicles of chaplets or cauliflorous spikes; Stamens more than 10, monadelphous. The fruit is flat, straight, slightly curved or rolled, membranous or coriaceous, dehiscent or indehiscent; Spherical-flattened or quadrangular seeds, papyraceous test, without aril.

GESNERIACEAE

Nautilocalyx

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Nautilocalyx Flower
Nautilocalyx is visited by bees.

Nautilocalyx is a genus of plant in family Gesneriaceae. Characterized by an obligate terrestrial habit; leaf blades that are cuneate to attenuate at the base; and funnelform corolla with an oblique limb and reflexed petal lobes with glandular trichomes clustered on the lateral and lower inner surfaces of the throat.

HELICONIACEAE

Heliconia

Heliconia is a Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest
Heliconia HELICONIACEAE

Heliconia is a genus of flowering plants in the Heliconiaceae. native to the tropical Americas, but a few are indigenous to certain islands of the western Pacific and Maluku. Many species of Heliconia are found in rainforests or tropical wet forests of these regions.

These herbaceous plants range from 0.5 to nearly 4.5 meters (1.5–15 feet) tall depending on the species. The simple leaves of these plants are 15–300 cm (6 in-10 ft). They are characteristically long, oblong, alternate, or growing opposite one another on non-woody petioles often longer than the leaf, often forming large clumps with age.

Wildflowers of Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Heliconia
Heliconia
HELICONIACEAE

Their flowers are produced on long, erect or drooping panicles, and consist of brightly colored waxy bracts, with small true flowers peeping out from the bracts. The growth habit of heliconias is similar to Canna, Strelitzia, and bananas, to which they are related. The flowers can be hues of reds, oranges, yellows, and greens, and are subtended by brightly colored bracts. The plants typically flower during the wet season. These bracts protect the flowers; floral shape often limits pollination to a subset of the hummingbirds.

LECYTHIDACEAE

Grias

Fruits of the Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Grias
Grias LECYTHIDACEAE

Grias is a genus of flowering plants in the family Lecythidaceae, It is native to northwestern South America, Central America, and Jamaica.
They are small to medium-sized trees, growing to 5-15 m tall. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, simple, broadly lanceolate, very large, up to 1 m long, with an entire or waved margin. The flowers are creamy white to yellow, with four petals; they are cauliflorous, produced in clusters on the trunk and stouter branches. The fruit is 6-15 cm long, with a fleshy coat; it is edible in several species.

Gustavia

The genus Gustavia belongs to the part of the Lecythidaceae that has regular or actinomorphic flowers and is considered basal among the Neotropical genera.

It is widely distributed along rivers margins throughout Amazonia and in the Guianas and the distribution extends as far into north-eastern Brazil.

MARANTACEAE

Calathea

Calathea MARANTACEAE
Calathea MARANTACEAE

Calathea is a genus of plants belonging to the family Marantaceae. There are several dozen species in this genus. Native to the tropical Americas;  the large and tough leaves are popular for holding small items wrapping forest food. many of the species are popular as pot plants due to their decorative leaves and, in some species, colorful inflorescences. Calathea foliage is of importance to some herbivores, such as the caterpillars of the Owl Butterfly (Caligo sp). Due to habitat destruction, several species are threatened with extinction.

Calathea flowers are pollinated mainly by bees and other bugs. Hummingbirds visit the Calathea flowers throughout the forest. Calathea flowers bracts come in various shapes – beehive shape flower bracts to rattlesnake tail shape.

MARCGRAVIACEAE

Marcgravia

Marcgravia is a genus of plant in family Marcgraviaceae, native to the Caribbean Islands, Central America, and South America. Marcgravia is also is known as Shingle vine. It’s a fast-growing flowering vine found in moist, humid conditions of the rainforest climbing high on trees. It’s flat-leaved vines grab hold of tree trunks with aerial roots. Once it climbs high enough, Marcgravia sends out lateral branches and blooms with pendulous flower clusters which are pollinated by birds and bats.

MELASTOMATACEAE

Miconia

Miconia
Miconia MELASTOMATACEAE

Miconia is a genus of flowering plants in the glory bush family, Melastomataceae, native to warm temperate to tropical regions of the Americas. The species are mostly shrubs and small to medium-sized trees up to 15 m tall. Some species are known by the common name “Johnny Berry”. Miconia fruit are a favorite food of many birds. The leaves of some species are eaten by caterpillars of the interesting moth-butterflies (Hedylidae).

Many species are threatened by habitat destruction in their native range, and some are feared to be on the brink of extinction. On the other hand, Miconia. is a contributing factor in the decline and maybe even extinction of other plants: it has become a highly invasive weed on a number of Pacific Islands where it was introduced.

SIPARUNACEAE

Siparuna

Siparuna is a genus of plants belonging to the family Siparunaceae. Dioecious or monoecious sarmentose shrubs, treeless, or trees to 40 m high, aromatic due to abundant quantities of volatile oil in oil cells throughout the plant, sparsely or densely pubescent, found throughout the Neotropic ecozone

Leaves decussate or in whorls of 3-6, simple, exstipulate, those of a pair occasionally unequal in size, with stellate, lepidote, or simple hairs, the margin variously serrate, dentate, or entire. Inflorescences axillary or cauliflorous, cymose, sometimes fasciculate.

Fruit consisting of the fleshy receptacle which at maturity splits irregularly to expose (1-) 3-25 small drupelets with a conspicuous red or orange aril (in the neotropical species), the endocarp stony.

PASSIFLORACEAE

Passiflora

Passiflora PASSIFLORACEAE
Passiflora
PASSIFLORACEAE

Passiflora is a genus of the family Passifloraceae. Known also as the passion flowers or passion fruits, They are mostly vines, with some being shrubs, and a few species being herbaceous.  The family Passifloraceae has a pantropical distribution. Passiflora itself is absent from Africa, where many other members of the family Passifloraceae occur (e.g. the more plesiomorphic Adenia). Most species are found in South America, eastern Asia, southern Asia, and New Guinea.

The size and structure of flowers of other Passiflora species is optimized for pollination by hummingbirds (especially hermits like Phaethornis), bumble bees, Carpenter bees, wasps or bats, while others are self-pollinating. The sword-billed hummingbird (Ensifera ensifera) with its immensely elongated bill has co-evolved with certain passion flowers, such as P. mixta.
The leaves are used as food plants by the larva of a number of lepidopterans (Heliconius and Agraulis). To prevent the butterflies from laying too many eggs on any single plant, some passion flowers bear small colored nubs which resemble the butterflies’ eggs and seem to fool them into believing that more eggs have already been deposited on a plant that actually is the case. Also, many Passiflora species produce sweet nutrient-rich liquid from glands on their leaf stems.

These fluids attract ants which will kill and eat many pests that they happen to find feeding on the passion flowers.

POACEAE

Pariana

Pariana is a genus of the grass family Poaceae tropical American plants in. It is native to South America. Plants can be tall and stout, evergreen, perennial grass with densely leafy culms, usually growing 1 meter tall.

RUBIACEAE

Capirona

Capirona is a monotypic genus of flowering plants in the Rubiaceae family. The genus contains only one species, A tree can grow up to a height of 30 meters. A canopy tree, which is native to northern South America. It grows white or green flowers between March and April. It fruits between July and November, seeds are dispersed by the wind and water. Its wood is used for lumber.

During the flowering months, it produces an abundance of white, aromatic flowers, which are followed by elongated seed pods with 3-5 seeds inside.  Its bark is shed periodically to avoid lichens, fungi, epiphytes, and lianas. Bark has antifungal properties for the skin.

Faramea

Faramea is a genus of plant in family Rubiaceae. Plants can be Shrubs or small trees, usually glabrous. Stipules persistent, connate at the base, spit or arist at the apex. Inflorescence axillary, umbellate, with few flowers. Fruit drupaceous, coriaceous, subglobose; a seed.

The genus Faramea consists of more than 200 species distributed from Mexico to southern Brazil. In Ecuador there are 20 species best represented in the lowlands; 4 species have been recorded in the Andean forests:

Palicourea

Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Palicourea
Coffee cousin brings hummingbirds when flowering
Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest, Palicourea RUBIACEAE
Palicourea attracts hummingbirds of several species. RUBIACEAE

Palicourea is a plant genus in the family Rubiaceae. A wide range in habits from shrubs to small trees distributed widely in the New World tropics. Palicourea plants are typically found in the understory and subcanopy of moist to wet tropical forests, from low to high elevations. Palicourea flowers have well-developed tubes and are odorless, mostly brightly colored, and assumed to be pollinated by hummingbirds, and its fleshy blue or purple-black fruits are dispersed by birds. Nearly all Palicourea species are distylous; this appears to be the ancestral condition for the genus, and it seems to have been lost in at least a few species on Caribbean islands

In Ecuador, at least 50 species are represented; 28 have been recorded in the Andean forests:

Psychotria

Psychotria is a genus of flowering plants in the Rubiaceae family. It is one of the largest genera of flowering plants. The genus has a pantropical distribution and members of the genus are from low to mid-elevation understorey trees in tropical forests. This heterostylous plant is hummingbird-pollinated, though it is visited by other insects such as butterflies, and its small blue fruits are dispersed by birds. The presence of alkaloids has led to its common use as a medicinal plant within indigenous populations

Warszewiczia

Flowers structure of Warszewiczia plants. RUBIACEAE
Warszewiczia RUBIACEAE

Warszewiczia is a genus of flowering plants in the Rubiaceae family. They are primarily tropical Central and South American trees and shrubs.

The inflorescences show leaf-shaped, bright-colored calycophylls, expanded foliaceous structures made from floral petaloid with enlarged showy calyx-lobes. Their main task is to attract pollinators such as butterflies.  Perhaps the most famous member of the genus is W. coccinea (Chaconia), which is the national flower of Trinidad and Tobago.

MALVACEAE

Herrania

Herrania is a genus of flowering plants in the family Malvaceae. Small tree. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests; it is fragmented due to colonization, mining, and deforestation

Clavija

Clavija is a strange and little-known genus in the Primulaceae from the tropics of the new world. It is a palm-like, sparsely branched shrub to about 4 m tall, native to lowland forests in Colombia and Ecuador with long, undivided leaves, thick, waxy, scented flowers that are followed by edible, plum-sized, round, yellow fruits with a sharp taste.

MALVACEAE

Apeiba

Apeiba is a genus of flowering plant in the Malvaceae family. A fast-growing canopy tree in disturbed primary forest and the more open, secondary formations tree that can grow up to 30 meters tall. The wood of Apeiba is soft and lightweight and used for rafts, the bark fibrous and used for making rope. The fruits are conspicuous woody-capsules, globose to flattened-globose, and covered with spines or bristles, giving the plant the local name of “monkey’s comb”

VERBENACEAE

Vitex

Vitex is a genus of flowering plants in the family Verbenaceae, a genus of shrubs and trees to 35m tall. Some species have whitish bark that is characteristically furrowed. Leaves are opposite, usually, compound. The fruit is a drupe.

Easy Plants to Remember from the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador

Check some of the Easy Plants to Remember from the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador.

The first time you enter the Amazon Rainforest, you will feel overloaded with Shapes, Colors, Textures, Odors, and Taste from the vast community of plants living in here.

All trees, lianas, shrubs, epiphytes, and parasites are living in chaotic harmony, you will soon discover that everything in the Rainforest is connected and those connections start revealing in front of your eyes, we call it Wild Learning!

Easy Plants to Remember from the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador
Nautilocalyx GESNERIACEAE
Easy Plants to Remember from the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador
Heliconia HELICONIACEAE

The Amazon Rainforest is home to as many as 80,000 plant species from which more than 40,000 species play a critical role in regulating the global climate and sustaining the local water cycle.

Easy Plants facts from the Yasuni to Remember
Miconia MELASTOMATACEAE

The Yasuní Biosphere Reserve is known to be one of the most biodiverse places on Earth.

Check some Easy Plants facts from the Yasuni to Remember

In just one hectare in Yasuní, there are more tree, shrub, and liana (woody vines) species than anywhere else in the world. Check the numbers.

In a single hectare of the Yasuni (2.47 acres) 655 species of trees, were found which is equal to the continental US and Canada combined.

In a research plot of 25 hectares of primary Rainforest of the Yasuni, the number of tree species rises to 1,100.

Here is a list of the easy plants to recognize when exploring remote villages, or national park while you are visiting the Amazon Rainforest.

Get familiar with the Common Plants of the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador.

  • Aphelandra ACANTHACEAE)
  • Philodendron (ARACEAE)
  • Anthurium (ARACEAE)
  • Begonia (BEGONIACEAE)
  • Centropogon (CAMPANULACEAE)
  • Dichorisandra (COMMELINACEAE)
  • Geogenanthus (COMMELINACEAE)
  • Costus (COSTACEAE)
  • Abarema (FABACEAE)
  • Calliandra (FABACEAE)
  • Brownea (FABACEAE)
  • Zygia (FABACEAE)
  • Nautilocalyx (GESNERIACEAE)
  • Heliconia (HELICONIACEAE)
  • Grias (LECYTHIDACEAE)
  • Gustavia (LECYTHIDACEAE)
  • Calathea (MARANTACEAE)
  • Marcgravia  (MARCGRAVIACEAE)
  • Miconia (MELASTOMATACEAE)
  • Siparuna (SIPARUNACEAE)
  • Passiflora (PASSIFLORACEAE )
  • Pariana (POACEAE)
  • Capirona (RUBIACEAE)
  • Faramea (RUBIACEAE)
  • Palicourea (RUBIACEAE)
  • Psychotria (RUBIACEAE)
  • Warszewiczia (RUBIACEAE
  • Herrania (MALVACEAE)
  • Clavija (PRIMULACEAE)
  • Apeiba (MALVACEAE)
  • Vitex  (VERBENACEAE)
Grias
Grias LECYTHIDACEAE

Download An illustrated list of Conspicuous Plants plants of the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador.

The Birds Living in the Amazon Rainforest

The Birds Living in the Amazon Rainforest of Ecuador.

The Birds Living in the Amazon Rainforest
The Yellow-browed Antbird lives inside terra firme on the Southern bank of the Napo River.

All the Living Birds of the Amazon Rainforest in Ecuador can be found in all the forest formations, the birds have adapted to live with all the resources provided by the Western Amazon Basin.

Habitats where the Birds of the Amazon Rainforest lives:

  • Terra Firme
  • Varzea
  • Forest Swamp
  • Forest Streams
  • Moriche Swamp

The Birds living in the Amazon Rainforest are very diverse in their lifestyle, with many species living in the ground,  many others at mid-level in the forest and a lot of action happens in the canopy, many species trail throughout the forest in small social clubs that we call mixed species flock, many would surprising us in size, colors, sounds, behaviour.

We list some of the most diverse families of birds found in the largest tract of rainforest in Ecuador, found in terra firme, varzea, flooded forest, forest swamps, moriche swamps, rivers, forest streams, oxbow lakes and roadsides

Depending in the spectrum of the habitats in a determined area, the abilities of the species to establish in that area, birds can be found almost everywhere you go, colorful tanagers, skulking antbirds, dancing manakins, oropendolas, macaws.

The Most Diverse Amazonian Bird Families

The most diverse amazonian bird families found at Shiripuno Amazon Lodge, recorded over 10 years of observations:

  • Flycatchers: 80 species
  • Antbirds: 50 species
  • Tanagers: 37 species
  • Ovenbirds: 27 species
  • Kites, Eagles & Hawks: 26 species
  • Hummingbirds: 26 species
  • Parrot & Macaws: 18 species
  • Woodpeckers:17 species
  • Woodcreepers: 17 species
  • Manakin: 12 species
  • Puffbirds: 12 species

Quick Fact:

The largest bird living in the Amazon Rainforest is: The King Vulture (Sarcoramphus papa) with an overall length ranges from 67–81 centimeters (27–32 in) and its wingspan is 1.2–2 meters (4–6.6 ft). Its weight ranges from 2.7–4.5 kilograms (6–10 lb). And the smallest is also one of the smallest birds on Earth: The Short-tailed Pygmy Tyrant (Myiornis ecaudatus)  with a body length of 6.5 centimeters, and its weight 4·2 grams.

Download Our Bird List